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New Deal



Definition

The “New Deal” refers to a series of programs, public work projects, and financial reforms enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United States between 1933 and 1939 in response to the Great Depression. These strategies were aimed at providing relief for the unemployed and poor, recovery of the economy back to normal levels, and reform of the financial system to prevent a repeat depression. It fundamentally restructured American government and economy, having lasting effect.

Phonetic

The phonetic spelling of “New Deal” is: /nuː diːl/

Key Takeaways

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  1. The New Deal was a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms, and regulations enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United States between 1933 and 1939. It responded to needs for relief, reform, and recovery from the Great Depression.
  2. Major federal programs and agencies included the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), the Civil Works Administration (CWA), the Farm Security Administration (FSA), the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (NIRA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA). They provided support for farmers, the unemployed, youth and the elderly.
  3. The New Deal’s most lasting effects came from its reforms to the financial system, including the creation of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the passage of the Glass-Steagall Act and the creation of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. These reforms helped to prevent a repetition of the stock market crash in 1929 and created a more stable financial system.

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Importance

The term “New Deal” is important in business/finance because it refers to a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms, and regulations enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United States during the 1930s. The New Deal was designed to help the country recover from the severe economic depression known as the Great Depression. This policy included efforts to stimulate economic recovery and reforms to prevent a similar economic catastrophe in the future. Measures such as the creation of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) aimed at re-regulating much of the U.S. financial system are still influential today. Therefore, the New Deal is not just a significant historical event, but it continues to have a profound impact on current economic and business practices and policies.

Explanation

The New Deal was a series of public policies, economic reforms, and relief programs enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United States between 1933 and 1939. Its primary purpose was to help lift the United States out of the Great Depression. The New Deal was designed to stabilize the economy, provide jobs for the unemployed, and protect the future health of the financial industry. Relief, recovery, and reform were the main objectives of the New Deal, and it sought to provide relief for the unemployed and poor, recovery of the economy to normal levels, and reform of the financial system to prevent a repeat depression.The New Deal included numerous programs and agencies, often referred to by their acronyms. These initiatives had varying degrees of success, but collectively they drastically increased the scope and scale of the federal government’s influence on the American economy. Key programs like the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) were designed to provide large-scale employment, while measures like the Social Security Act established important social safety nets. Other programs, like the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), increased regulation of banks and the stock market to prevent another catastrophic financial collapse. Thus, the New Deal aimed to stabilize the economy and provide the foundation for long-term, sustainable economic growth.

Examples

1. Roosevelt’s New Deal: The term “New Deal” primarily refers to a series of economic relief programs implemented by U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt in response to the Great Depression. These proposals, which included the creation of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA), and the National Recovery Administration (NRA), aimed to stabilize the economy by creating jobs, increasing consumer spending, protecting farmers, and implementing regulations on Wall Street.2. The European Green New Deal: The European Commission put forward the European Green Deal for a sustainable EU economy so the EU can reach climate neutrality by 2050. It seeks to transform the EU into a fair and prosperous society with a sustainable and resource-efficient economy.3. Green New Deal in the United States: A more recent example could be the Green New Deal proposed by some U.S. politicians. The Green New Deal is a proposed package of United States legislation that aims to address climate change and economic inequality. The name refers back to the New Deal, a set of social and economic reforms and public works projects undertaken by President Roosevelt in response to the Great Depression. The Green New Deal combines Roosevelt’s economic approach with modern ideas such as renewable energy and resource efficiency.

Frequently Asked Questions(FAQ)

What is the New Deal?

The New Deal was a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms, and regulations enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United States between 1933 and 1939. It was intended to help the US recover from the Great Depression.

Who implemented the New Deal?

The New Deal was implemented by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

What was the purpose of the New Deal?

The primary purpose of the New Deal was to provide economic relief, recovery, and reform in response to the Great Depression. This involved implementing new policies to stabilize the banking system, provide jobs, and improve infrastructure.

What are some key programs or laws enacted under the New Deal?

Some key programs included the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), the Works Progress Administration (WPA), and the Social Security Act. Key laws included the Securities Act of 1933, the Glass–Steagall Act of 1933, and the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938.

Was the New Deal successful?

This question has been the subject of ongoing debate among historians and economists. While some cite the New Deal as pivotal in restoring economic stability and providing jobs to lower-income Americans, others argue that it extended the length of the Great Depression and contributed to the expansion of government power.

How did the New Deal impact federal government?

The New Deal significantly expanded the role of the federal government in the economy, leading to the creation of numerous agencies and regulations that still exist today. These include the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Is the New Deal still in effect today?

While many of the specific programs and projects initiated under the New Deal have since concluded or been transformed, numerous regulatory agencies and financial reforms established during this period continue to effect the U.S. economy and governmental structure.

Related Finance Terms

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • Great Depression
  • Public Works Administration (PWA)
  • Social Security Act
  • Works Progress Administration (WPA)

Sources for More Information


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