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3 Ways the Pandemic Influenced Retirement for the Better

Posted on November 5th, 2022
Influenced Retirement Savings

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans say they reevaluated their financial management practices, which included their retirement plans.

In a Schwab study, 1,000 Americans between the ages of 25 and 70 were asked how they expected their spending, saving, and financial situations to change as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Approximately half of those who responded to the study (48 percent) said they wanted to save more money overall.

Most people today do not grow up with a piggy bank, and they don’t know how the savings game is played. So when investing, a person today feels like they have to find a consultant or a savings coach, which is kind of ridiculous.

Are there more spenders or savers in the world?

Some feel that the human heart is naturally miserly and wants to hoard gold — and squirrel away greenbacks. But is that what savings is all about?

Are you satisfied with your current savings plan? Do you even have one? Or do you just trust luck for your retirement?

The industrious ant and the lazy grasshopper

Remember the tale of the industrious ant and lazy grasshopper? The ant worked through the summer, saving up food. The grasshopper preferred to play the fiddle. When the snow lay thick on the ground, the ant had plenty to eat — the hopper starved to death.

Millennials save more than their parents did at that age

It’s rumored that millennials are saving much more than their parents did at that age. Some theories say that it’s because their parents haven’t saved enough for retirement, and they feel it could happen to them, too. However, no retirement HAS happened to thousands in the past few years.

As a result of COVID-19, the poll found three areas in which Americans’ retirement savings habits are changing.

1. Following the outbreak, more than a third of individuals want to boost their 401(k) contributions.

According to the study’s results, around 36% of Americans intend to boost the proportion of their paycheck into their 401(k) each month following the outbreak.

This translates to more significant total savings and the possibility of receiving more free money in matches.

401(k) plans are only accessible through an employer — but if one is offered, a 401(k) is an incredible tool for saving money.

A 401(k) account automatically withdraws a particular portion of your paycheck and deposits it into a savings account where it can grow over time.

Contribute to your savings automatically

Saving money regularly where the money is automatically taken out should appear obvious to everyone — but that’s not the case. Instead, when you contribute to your retirement fund, your employer will match your contribution up to a certain percentage of your pay.

Don’t be shy about asking your employer about a 401(k) savings account — the first possible chance you get. But, be bold and take the bull by the horns — the sooner you begin or add to your savings account, the better and the longer your money will have time to compound and grow.

Increase your assets

Approximately one-third of those surveyed want to increase their assets outside of their 401(k) plans. It’s the old fear of putting too many eggs in one basket or maybe counting your coupons before they hatch.

2. People are following savings advice in the aftermath of the outbreak that they didn’t consider before.

According to Schwab’s findings, 35 percent of Americans are considering increasing their investments outside their 401(k)s due to the epidemic.

Retirement accounts, such as IRAs, are among the finest locations to put your money to work. They are considered the gold standard.

Do a deep dive into the tax advantages of savings

Accounts in this category provide tax advantages not accessible through individual taxable investment accounts (IRAs). For example, an IRA is available to those not employed by a company, and practically anybody may open one — anyone with a bank account.

Can illegals save money for retirement?

The word on Capital Hill is that legislation is pending to open the gates even wider. Meaning that even illegal aliens may soon have the opportunity to save and have retirement accounts, no matter what constituents think about it.

Often, these accounts may be opened online, making it convenient for those worried about being profiled.

Retirement savings and investment accounts other than 401(k)s can help you save more. They also take advantage of tax reductions and other benefits.

3. More than 30% of respondents want to pay off debt, which is excellent news for the future.

Around 34% of people answered the survey question about how much debt they had. According to the findings, people want to pay off debt more than ever before — especially after the pandemic.

Get out of debt and stay out of debt

Of course, that’s a significant starting step for anyone who is coming close to retirement age — but it’s an essential step in building your retirement money at any age to stay out of debt.

Becoming debt-free in retirement is a strategy that many retirees swear by since it allows them to stretch their money further and relieves them of one additional obligation when living on a limited income later in life.

Consolidate your credit card and other debt

Consolidating credit cards or other debts may also be beneficial in lowering the interest rate charged.

Remember that a fool and their money are soon parted — and you want to have a lot of money invested and ready for when you hit retirement age. The only way to have a great retirement with choices is to have invested and saved money early in life.

Max Palmer

Max Palmer

I'm Max and I love helping businesses we work with to expand their businesses online. I help with invoicing, time tracking and overall business needs for business owners. If you need help contact me today.

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